Skip to main content

About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
do a rock launch page. molly, let's chat with you. there was a city hearing about applying hotel tax to your rentals. tell us about what happened. >> last wednesday, the tax collector called a hearing to discuss the applicability of the transient occupancy tax to short-term rentals and operators. we were concerned about this tax and its applicability to airbnb and our community. they showed up in great numbers at the hearing. our main concern is that we vote regularly to increase our own taxes. i do not think any of us are completely opposed to taxes. our concern is the tax code was written in 1961, long before the sharing economy existed, the internet, and the new thing we call airbnb. something that was written for corporate hotels and guests should not be applied to something that is entirely new, to permanent residents of san francisco who are occasionally renting out a couch or bedroom to a visitor, with whom the form great lasting friendships quite often. we announced that the entire city family take time to think about whether the existing laws should apply to the new activity
a business plan. then we look at the three-year tax return and that statement. we do a lot of home care and mom-and-pop shops. we also do start ups. we asked for approval through documents. we work a lot with people who do not know how to file taxes properly. we are mainly focused in san francisco. we are small. we focus mainly on the tenderloin, chinatown, bayview, visitation. we do a lot of expansion. people start small through the credit union and then want to go to the bank. we know we are limited. we cannot afford to give out a big loan. starting from the credit union, we educate them about filing taxes properly and then moving on to the bank, a small one, expansion, and we work with the bank. the bank and credit union are similar. we do allow tax returns, projections. credit unions do not charge an additional loan or processing fee. processing time, on a small loan, -- consumer loans probably a few days. because we require a business plan, sometimes it takes longer. business plans take a while. especially bank statements. we need to see consistent income coming in. so far, a credi
your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits available with that. for non-profit, charitable organizations, we have a workshop coming up. that is helpful for those of you who are looking to access the committee on a durable basis. >> also, on behalf of leader pelosi, i want to thank our panel and her staff. we are tenants in this building. i apologize for the security situation that happened upstairs. if you have concerns about it, please come and see me. i would like to convey those to the landlord here so that it does not happen again. thank you. >> hi, everybody. my name is carmen chu. why don't we get started. with a marking up with the department of small business -- we have been working with the department of small business. this project started when we heard from neighborhood merchants. unfortunately, they had access issues, visibility access issues. we have been working closely with many of our partners year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank
out there. how to do that, it remains to be seen. but then that will require some other tax. that would be my big request like everybody else. get america's finances under control and that will take both parties. it will take taxes and it will take reduction in commitments that have been made. it now can be validated. let's get this but do it in a way that exacerbates the uncertain economy. the second -- we have to happen through innovation. whether it is the space program or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of
put in tax credits and policies of the public utilities commission to favor alternative energy, independent power production. which is obvious today. when they promoted code- generation it was something very novel. 30 years ago. now you have a different name for a period in his third party power production using power in a driving way to recapture the most efficient way. innovation is important. i have to also, every time we heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. wh
. she had had 16 tax cuts signed into law to help small businesses grow and thrive. as we know, during the last 15 years, small businesses account for about 2/3 of the job growth in our country, but when the bush recession hits in 2009, 2010, small businesses were hit particularly hard. small businesses are the center of her agenda. congress under her leadership gave 27 million small businesses tax cuts. two main pieces of legislation -- the small businesses jobs act in the information you have, will create a total of 500,000 jobs and create eight tax cuts. they are all described in the packet you have. also, unleashing up to $300 billion in credit for small businesses to access. there are another eight tax cuts that were passed through a number of different laws. some of our panelists will address those. even though now we are in an environment where there is a republican majority in the house and a slimmer majority in the senate, please note that the leader and democrats are going fight hard to keep their agenda and restart our economy, and there will be more work to be done. i would
to you the team that brought the treasured tax collector's office to the 21st century. the municipal tax automation team, darrell ascano, tajel shah, and rebecca villareal- mayer, come on up. [applause] >> i've been anointed to speak for us. jose has asked me to use my outside voice. we are so lucky. very rarely in your life to you get a blank canvas with leadership to tell you to find problems and solve them. i want to thank our leadership for doing that and giving us not only the opportunity to make change, but also to really make mistakes. i think that's a rare thing, to be able to make mistakes in this environment and continue to proceed and be successful. i mean it when we say -- what we end up doing is so different. we work to scale every day. we invite the people that we serve every day. thank you to the nominees. to our leadership, thank you. thank you to all the winners and to all the people we get to work with and serve. thanks. [applause] >> let's hear it for the tax team. [applause] >> parking is a universal quality of life issue. it touches on so many different parts of the
-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have clean water because we're investing in it now. hunter: there were no alternatives. the infrastructure was in dire straits. a lot of people didn't want to believe it had to be done, but it had to be done. what came out of those lawsuits by the upper chattahoochee river keeper were two consent decrees, focused on overflows. the intent is, city of atlanta, you need to keep the flows in the pipe. narrator: with the help of the funding the city raised, atlanta has been implementing an asset management plan that evaluates and addresses their infrastructure issues. hunter: it's a continuum. at one end, you have your regular maintenance that you do every day on the system, and at the other end, long-term planning so that every year we're repairing, replacing the right things, and we don't have to do it all at once, which is,
together. we can talk about regulation and pension and taxes and the government. a lot of that is [inaudible] a survey said housing prices are too high and that is a negative factor on recruitment. i thought, maybe we can bring the prices down. foreclosure works magic. i do not think you want that. you want rising wealth which could translate into a rising houses -- housing prices. you can increase density and breakdown similar rules, you get more people. there's a lot of things. as i drove down here from oakland cut -- oakland, i saw those cars in the ordinary lanes. one person per car. you have this one person with all this steel and plastic and oil. it is ridiculous. we're figuring out ways to do that. whether it is high speed rail or electric cars. the first will be rolling off the factory in treatments in the next few months -- in three months and in the next few months. yes, the innovative companies are small. the electric cars -- the tanks are small but so is fairchild or in tal or hewlett-packard -- intel or hewlett-packard or steve jobs. the seats we plant brin
might be able to revamp our tax code for the benefit of job creation. little did we know a year later, that invitation has caused over 125 companies to locate in our city, creating thousands of more jobs, creating an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spiri
with the city could do in terms of regulation to help your businesses. we talked about the tax issue. what with each of you say is an issue the city could help with. >> i will start. one thing we would like to see is to make parking easier. we want it to be as easy to share your car as possible, and if you when your car and the renter cannot find a parking spot, that is an issue we need to solve. there are actually great models from around the world in terms of on street parking or some sort of system to not only encourage car owners to share, but also not discourage people from using private car sharing because parking is an issue. we have been piloting this a little bit, and we hope to actually see something come out around parking. obviously, the other issues we have discussed impact any of the schering economy companies. you could also see opportunities to educate the public or just gain awareness for the services through the city and existing programs. >> i forgot to repeat the question, but the question is -- what regulations to the company's what? >> that is a great question. we wou
$55 million in tax revenue. nightlife is the only significant industry in this city that sometimes gets treated at times as it is a nuisance, a problem to be managed. and of course, we have to focus on making sure it is safe and that people are complying with the laws and that we are not having shooting. but when you get so focused on combating the negatives -- every industry has the negatives. you can sometimes lose sight of the positives and we know there are a huge positives for nightlife in the city. we know that a lot of our street shares are at risk -- street fairs are at risk of being given fees to death. we have completely outdated the planning commission like that mission how are used district, which makes it extremely hard to do anything alcohol related in a big swath of the mission. there was a bowling alley that wanted to go in at 17th and van ness and they were not going to be able to do it because they would have been banned from even selling beer. that is the tip of the iceberg in terms of planning provisions that make it hard to foster a knife in the city. we are no
in a city that is over-taxing the and running down. [applause] >> i do think that you can do a lot through talking to your city supervisor and working through that process. i am telling you, there are ways that began help you. alcohol is a local issue on this type of matter. what we are behind would you guys want to do, whenever that is. a lot of times we do not always have statutes that make that much sense. it is partly the ways that the laws have evolved and we are the ones who are stuck with enforcing them the way that they are. that does not necessarily mean that we think they are particularly good ideas, but we certainly want people to grow, prosper, and be saved. that can be achieved in all sorts of ways. we want to work with you on that. thank you. >> i was the founding president of the entertainment commission. i retired and went on to found the culture association, the first trade association statewide for night life, bar, and restaurant activities. i am here with a question that plagues a lot of these license holders, who desire to have their establishment opened for all age dan
health and prosperity, people working, raising families, paying taxes, voting, and volunteering in their communities, making a difference and giving back. while we can all take pride in the successes of 2011 recovery month events, we must now turn our attention to making 2012 another great year. i hope this show inspires you to organize a recovery month event this september. the 2012 theme is "join the voices for recovery: it's worth it." you can begin now by going to the recovery month web site for information on how to get started. as you can see from the events in 2011, recovery month events come in all shapes and sizes-any effort makes a difference! whatever type of event you choose to do, you will be bringing a sense of hope that people can live happy, healthy, and productive lives in recovery. thank you for everything you do to support recovery. help keep the momentum moving for this critical work this year, and please share your 2012 event by registering it on the recovery month web site and sharing your materials and successes so that we can highlight your event in our 2
issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o assistance with our many business partners. this is a core part of mfac original purpose in san francisco. we are focused on building this capacity once again. as everyone here knows, the nature of how cities are doing business is changing. fundamentally. costly federal and state mandates continue to squeeze local budgets. increasing costs are forcing discussions about how we provide services. technology is requiring that we move more quickly than we have in a long time. building a network of partners to support our city government at this time will be more important than ever and will be critical as we were to e
for this work is to be determined and dpw staff anticipate funding this segment with future gas tax, prop k or other available funding. we've kept the full amount program at dpw request. next is dolores. the draft we did bring you to in december. the project, dpw submitted dolores street pavement that project includes pedestrian enhancement. scheduled for construction in the fiscal year '14 and '15. there wasn't enough -- after funding higher ranking project, there weren't enough prop double a funds to fund all the eligible projects. the condition associate with this action, the condition which has been agreed to by dpw to fund the long street project unless dpw secures other funds. district six, safety projects. we recommended funding for two pet safety projects located in district six. one is mid clock crossing. it was identified in the neighborhood transportation plan. several of the treatments included in the mcallister street project, recommended in the 2007 and site on transportation plan. to know the mcallister project includes sidewalk expansion leverage a project funded by u.c. ha
with some tough budget decisions again, including where to make cuts and whether or not to increase taxes. how will you approached these hard choices? >> our budget is one of the very top challenges facing city government right now. over each of the years i have served, we have had to balance budget deficits that were around $500 million. this year, we're facing another budget deficit of almost $400 million. fortunately in recent years, we have had some ability to do some one-time budgeting tricks that allow us to balance the budget that do not exist this year. in past years, we've received federal stimulus money. we received more monies from the state government. last year our labor unions decided to contribute a quarter of a billion dollars to help balance last year's and this year's budget. those are things we do not have the ability to avail ourselves of us we balance the upcoming budget in a few months. we are faced with far fewer options. i think we are going to have to continue to look at very deep and difficult cuts. our priorities have to be insuring and protecting the most basic
for these types of properties and they're looking for ways to incentivize by tax abatement or property processing, priority processing or some other way the commission and the board of supervisors can make it easier for the businesses and cultural events remain in place. >> okay. thanks. >> thank you. >> i'm sorry commissioner sugaya. >> just a comment. i think that the discussion that's been going on and i think ideas they mainly proposed by commissioner martinez was along the lines if there was a possibility having some kind of designation or recognition or some process -- not necessarily for properties alone, but for other businesses or whatever, and then to try to tie those somehow to some kind of incentives or things that don't currently exist and i think that's where the issue is. kind of like how do you designate and recognize and what are the incentives afterwards? or protections too? >> the board of appeals did meet last night. it was actually the first meeting where we had five members and commissioner honda was approved last week and had the first meeting with the board of appeals l
and -- we got a twitter tax break and that's haduppic effects on the community. >> thank you. any further public comment? please come to the mic. >> thank you. my name is tim quail and represent tcs architecture and the design professional community generally. i just want to say we're long time resident of the sally district in the western soma area, and as an advocate for design professionals and continued use in that area we have a historic presence. often we represent a sort of cross roads of other creative arts, graphic designers, artists, industrialists, fabricators, shops and all of them have a historic presence in the neighborhood that we wish to continue growing. we represent a glue that keeps the creative community together and you would do yourself a favor to broaden the use at the sally designation to include design professionallings. thank you. >> thank you. >> good afternoon vice chair wu and commissioners. i am jerry crawlly representing neighborhood network. i feel like a deb taunt tonight. i have been not been here for two years and this is an important occasion fo
those implement tax document for the plan that goes into the detail projected impact fee will accumulate and how it will be used but it's not my recognize recollection is that there was a concern that, that plan didn't go into the specifications or provide time lines they have project this the plan that they don't prioritize those project or policies in the plan as being important or more important to being taken implementation actions earlier than others and so that one was a little more indepth than the bullet point. >> okay and then it says that the commission recommends exploring new strategies including use of public art for integrating historical history in historical preservation i don't have an issue with that and the other one is that we took axon option for which i think in the last one we don't need to deal with which, is specific language to i think, they are more technical changes of the code. >>> the last bullet point from the hp c which, is sub bullet point are specific change that they proposes to the actual plan and all of it fit within the preservation section of pl
that tax the schedule to see when he is going shopping -- this is an illustration of a network of fact or network model of the good life. the neighbor says, always check on line to see what joe needs. the physician's assistant says it is easy to share the test results. the personal care worker says i've posted on the loose handrail and they handled it right away. her sister says, i am part of a team now, what a relief. out of this idea of the network of fact, one is that this is what joe wants. this is her key to a good life. her network is actually her gateway to a good life and her ability to stay home. and we will launch a touch screen interface for those that want to connect through video. i want to share with you a few things that users are saying at telling us about their experience. 91% says that it helps them share information. that is the number one thing that people providing support to us want. 80% says that it strengthens connections. how can using something on-line actually make us feel closer or more connected to our friends and family? out it works, the more connected th
, people working, raising families, paying taxes, voting, and volunteering in their communities. people in recovery have reclaimed their lives and are now giving back. while we can all take pride in the successes of the 2011 recovery month events, we must now turn our attention to making 2012 another great year. i hope this show inspires you to organize a recovery month event next september. you can begin now by going to the recoverymonth.gov web site for information on how to get started. as you can see from the events in 2011, recovery month events come in all shapes and sizes. whatever type of event you choose to do, you will be bringing a sense of hope that people can live healthy, happy, and productive lives. thank you for everything you do to support recovery. let's keep up this exciting work in the coming year, and i sincerely hope that your event will be highlighted in our 2012 showcase of events. (music) for a copy of this program or other programs in the road to recovery series, call samhsa at 1-800-662-help, or order online at recoverymonth.gov, and click multimedia. >> good
we did was with tax dollars. you already paid for it, we're trying to give it back to you. and, so, we take a wholesale retail. we want to be the providers of the data as a fuel, but fuel, gasoline is useless to get you from point a to point b unless you consume that ultimately drives value to the american economy. our customer, i can completely agree with what shannon said in terms of our business objective, so to speak, is to empower entrepreneurs and innovators, to create jobs. that's a metric of success, not revenue generated per data set or some other per ifervance metric. the other piece of that looking back to the example of weather and gps, my monetization, is that together they contribute $100 billion to the american economy last year. last year alone from just those two data liberations. so, that is the way in which we are approaching from a strategy perspective, the ultimate impact to our customers. >> one super quick. one thing the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities have smaller budgets. having a structure to
. a larger cost on a smaller tax base, and, arguably, less affluent communities. man: sewickley township is a rural farming community, however, herminie itself would be considered to be the downtown area of the township. it's the agways, the auto-parts store, the bank. it's your typical small-town village. man: people think that rural areas are pristine and perfect and everybody has a nice, simple life. that's, uh, not exactly the situation here. when you come into town in the summer, you know you're coming to herminie. woman: the aroma in 90-degree days... can sometimes just want to knock you over. woman: we have water. we have power, we have gas, but we have no sewage. i guess when they laid out the town years ago, it just all went into the pipes and straight into the "crick." sabljak: i've lived here 43 years in the same house. when i moved here, they told us that sewage would be here shortly. and here it is 43 years later and we still don't have it. my husband and i went to the first meeting. he always said, "boy, i'll never see it in my lifetime." well... my husband passed away last
it is a regional benefit. the businesss in san francisco will benefit and we will see job creation and tax generation but also we will see it down the peninsula and throughout the region, as daniel said. we can accommodate it, we have accommodated events before. the super bowl last time was in stanford away and san francisco was the host and regional event. we are looking forward to it and the benefit this region will get from hosting the super bowl. >> the nfl will have the super bowl at meadowlands, outside new york -- how far santa clara is. could be the first snowy super bowl. is there any concern about the nfl, the fact in february we could have horrible rain or beautiful sunshine about the weather? >> i have looked ahead. it is supposed to be sunny that day. we are excited to put that in the bid package. my mom reminds me my birthday is february 4th, all grown up. we had all of my parties in the glorious sun so i think we are in good shape. we meet the nfl requirements of temperature. we are above that, so we are in great shape on that front. >> so be it. whatever. >> i don't think i
with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mea
more effective way that is going to save you tax dollars but also reduce the chance that they'll continue to spiral into those, like the stories we heard earlier today. [applause] >> if i could add one quick thought that ties with the first panel and this panel. it's the question of resource allocation. the point needs to be taken quite seriously especially with adolescents. if you get the diagnosis and the community is not ready to step up and do the interventions that are more humane, then the inhumane alternatives may end up costing more but being the easy political solution. >> i think we're out of time. i would like to thank everyone on the panel for their time.. >> thank you kindly. as an ex-felon, it's not my first effort with a public defender in public for a bunch of people who i know are working hard to make this substance abuse incarceration cognitive behavior thing work all together. i started doing my career in rehabs and jails and shelters and where i live. it's a privilege to work for people who chose to be the audience. oddly enough, they don't get that in the
on sundays, but you're going to lose a lot of taxpayer money -- sales tax money from people deciding to shop elsewhere. i'm thinking we need to have a color sticker that says operating sundays on the meters because the letters are going to start coming to the editorial pages saying what happened. they didn't know. even though you're going to do outreach, you're still going to have a lot of people who don't know. if you don't do it -- at least have television coverage and radio coverage and big-page ads in the newspapers, you're not going to be able to cover everybody. but the thing is people are going to -- once they get that whopping $75 ticket or whatever, they're going to decide they're not going to shop in san francisco. you're trying to get people to take public transit. they're not going to take all their bags shopping on the bus and go home. they just bought a nice expensive coat, birthday present for their spouse or their significant other and they're not going to want to carry it on the bus and have someone steal it from them, you know. a lot of people still don't feel safe being on
sure we talk about -- home-improvement results and building taxes. >> accessible. >> the other thing that might be brought out his people over- improved. there is a fine line. i recommend that my client or anyone talk to realtors before they start. it is a good idea to get an idea of that neighborhood, that house, and how it can be done. >> page 22 of the handout, spend an hour with the pro. talk about what the value means and how it will add value to your home, or if it will be over spending on something that maybe you can do without. >> exactly. >> it is very important to know why you are doing it. are you doing it to add value? will you live there for 20 years and you want a nicer kitchen? it cost $20,000, but only as $15,000 in value. it is different than if you want to sell it in three or four years. >> i had a lady who bought a couple of units and wanted my opinion years ago. she had an old victorian with an old brick foundation. she was absolutely convinced that the foundation had to be concrete and had to be concrete tomorrow. it was the first thing she did. she had different
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)